Acta Gymnica, 2018 (vol. 48), issue 1

Acta Gymnica 2018, 48(1):9-14 | DOI: 10.5507/ag.2018.003

Relationships between force-time curve variables and jump height during countermovement jumps in young elite volleyball players

Javad Sarvestan1, Mahdi Cheraghi2, Masoud Sebyani1, Elham Shirzad1, Zdeněk Svoboda3
1 Faculty of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran
2 Sport Biomechanics Center, National Olympic and Paralympic Academy of Iran, Tehran, Iran
3 Faculty of Physical Culture, Palacký University Olomouc, Olomouc, Czech Republic

Background: The importance of vertical jumps has been extensively recognised in sports. Furthermore, the main indicator of success in vertical jumps is the attained height, however, there is lack of knowledge on how the eccentric and concentric force-time curve variables affect the jump height.

Objective: The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between eccentric and concentric variables of the force-time curve and jump height in youth volleyball players.

Methods: Twelve elite volleyball players (male, Iranian national youth volleyball players, 17 ± 0.7 years) have participated in this study. The correlations between the force-time variables, including the peak force, relative peak force, peak power, average power, relative peak power, peak velocity, and modified reactive strength index, of the eccentric and concentric phases and jump height have been assessed based on Pearson's correlation coefficient.

Results: Results showed that the average power (r = .70, p = .034), relative peak power (r = .75, p = .029) and peak velocity (r = .98, p = .004) of the concentric phase and modified reactive strength index (r = .83, p = .014) significantly correlated with the jump height.

Conclusions: Relative peak power and average power of the concentric phase are shown to affect jump height in young volleyball players, whereby the vertical jump is their integral part.

Keywords: stretch-shortening cycle, CMJ, eccentric, concentric

Received: November 16, 2017; Accepted: January 25, 2018; Prepublished online: February 20, 2018; Published: March 31, 2018Show citation

ACS AIP APA ASA Harvard Chicago IEEE ISO690 MLA NLM Turabian Vancouver
Sarvestan, J., Cheraghi, M., Sebyani, M., Shirzad, E., & Svoboda, Z. (2018). Relationships between force-time curve variables and jump height during countermovement jumps in young elite volleyball players. Acta Gymnica48(1), 9-14. doi: 10.5507/ag.2018.003.
Download citation

References

  1. Carlock, J. M., Smith, S. L., Hartman, M. J., Morris, R. T., Ciroslan, D. A., Pierce, K. C., & Stone, M. H. (2004). The relationship between vertical jump power estimates and weightlifting ability: A field-test approach. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 18, 534-539. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  2. Clanton, T. O., Matheny, L. M., Jarvis, H. C., & Jeronimus, A. B. (2012). Return to play in athletes following ankle injuries. Sports Health, 4, 471-474. Go to original source...
  3. Claudino, J. G., Cronin, J., Mezêncio, B., McMaster, D. T., McGuigan, M., Tricoli, V., & Serrão, J. C. (2017). The countermovement jump to monitor neuromuscular status: A meta-analysis. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 20, 397-402. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  4. Cormie, P., McGuigan, M. R., & Newton, R. U. (2010). Changes in the eccentric phase contribute to improved stretch-shorten cycle performance after training. Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 42, 1731-1744. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  5. Duthie, G. M., Young, W. B., & Aitken, D. A. (2002). The acute effects of heavy loads on jump squat performance: An evaluation of the complex and contrast methods of power development. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 16, 530-538. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  6. Ebben, W., Flanagan, E., & Jensen, R. (2007). Gender similarities in rate of force development and time to takeoff during the countermovement jump. Journal of Exercise Physiology Online, 10, 10-17.
  7. Ebben, W. P., & Petushek, E. J. (2010). Using the reactive strength index modified to evaluate plyometric performance. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 24, 1983-1987. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  8. Henderson, G., Barnes, C. A., & Portas, M. D. (2010). Factors associated with increased propensity for hamstring injury in English Premier League soccer players. Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, 13, 397-402. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  9. Jidovtseff, B., Quievre, J., Harris, N. K., & Cronin, J. B. (2014). Influence of jumping strategy on kinetic and kinematic variables. Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness, 54, 129-138. Go to PubMed...
  10. Jiménez-Reyes, P., & González-Badillo, J. J. (2011). Control de la carga de entrenamiento a través del CMJ en pruebas de velocidad y saltos para optimizar el rendimiento deportivo en atletismo [Monitoring training load through the CMJ in sprints and jump events for optimizing performance in athletics]. Cultura, Ciencia y Deporte, 6, 207-217. Go to original source...
  11. Kirby, T. J., McBride, J. M., Haines, T. L., & Dayne, A. M. (2011). Relative net vertical impulse determines jumping performance. Journal of Applied Biomechanics, 27, 207-214. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  12. Kollias, I., Hatzitaki, V., Papaiakovou, G., & Giatsis, G. (2001). Using principal components analysis to identify individual differences in vertical jump performance. Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 72, 63-67. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  13. Laffaye, G., Wagner, P. P., & Tombleson, T. I. L. (2014). Countermovement jump height: Gender and sport-specific differences in the force-time variables. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28, 1096-1105. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  14. Markovic, G., Dizdar, D., Jukic, I., & Cardinale, M. (2004). Reliability and factorial validity of squat and countermovement jump tests. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 18, 551-555. Go to PubMed...
  15. McGinnis, R. S., Cain, S. M., Davidson, S. P., Vitali, R. V., Perkins, N. C., & McLean, S. G. (2016). Quantifying the effects of load carriage and fatigue under load on sacral kinematics during countermovement vertical jump with IMU-based method. Sports Engineering, 19, 21-34. Go to original source...
  16. McMahon, J. J., Murphy, S., Rej, S. J. E., & Comfort, P. (2017). Countermovement-jump-phase characteristics of senior and academy rugby league players. International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance, 12, 803-811. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  17. McMahon, J. J., Rej, S. J. E., & Comfort, P. (2017). Sex differences in countermovement jump phase characteristics. Sports, 5, 8. Go to original source...
  18. Moir, G. L. (2008). Three different methods of calculating vertical jump height from force platform data in men and women. Measurement in Physical Education and Exercise Science, 12, 207-218. Go to original source...
  19. Olsson, N., Silbernagel, K. G., Eriksson, B. I., Sansone, M., Brorsson, A., Nilsson-Helander, K., & Karlsson, J. (2013). Stable surgical repair with accelerated rehabilitation versus nonsurgical treatment for acute Achilles tendon ruptures: A randomized controlled study. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 41, 2867-2876. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  20. Owen, N. J., Watkins, J., Kilduff, L. P., Bevan, H. R., & Bennett, M. A. (2014). Development of a criterion method to determine peak mechanical power output in a countermovement jump. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 28, 1552-1558. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  21. Riggs, M. P., & Sheppard, J. M. (2009). The relative importance of strength and power qualities to vertical jumpheight of elite beach volleyball players during the counter-movement and squat jump. Journal of Human Sport and Exercise, 4, 221-236. Go to original source...
  22. Runge, M., Rittweger, J., Russo, C. R., Schiessl, H., & Felsenberg, D. (2004). Is muscle power output a key factor in the age-related decline in physical performance? A comparison of muscle cross section, chair-rising test and jumping power. Clinical Physiology and Functional Imaging, 24, 335-340. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  23. Russo, C. R., Lauretani, F., Bandinelli, S., Bartali, B., Cavazzini, C., Guralnik, J. M., & Ferrucci, L. (2003). High-frequency vibration training increases muscle power in postmenopausal women. Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 84, 1854-1857. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  24. Salles, A. S., Baltzopoulos, V., & Rittweger, J. (2011). Differential effects of countermovement magnitude and volitional effort on vertical jumping. European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111, 441-448. Go to original source...
  25. Schmidtbleicher, D. (1992). Training for power events. In P. V. Komi (Ed.), Strength and power in sport (pp. 381-385). Oxford, United Kingdom: Blackwell.
  26. Slinde, F., Suber, C., Surer, L., Edwén, C. E., & Svantesson, U. (2008). Test-retest reliability of three different countermovement jumping tests. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research, 22, 640-644. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...
  27. Wisløff, U., Castagna, C., Helgerud, J., Jones, R., & Hoff, J. (2004). Strong correlation of maximal squat strength with sprint performance and vertical jump height in elite soccer players. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 38, 285-288. Go to original source... Go to PubMed...

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY), which permits use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original publication is properly cited. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.