Acta Universitatis Palackianae Olomucensis. Gymnica, 2011 (vol. 41), issue 4

Acta Univ. Palacki. Olomuc., Gymn. 2011 41(4): 43-48 | 10.5507/ag.2011.025

Structure of a Questionnaire on Children's Attitudes towards Inclusive Physical Education (CAIPE-CZ)

Martin Kudláček, Ondřej Ješina, Julie Wittmannová
Faculty of Physical Culture, Palacky University, Olomouc

Background: The process of educating children with and without disabilities together has had many titles in the past, starting with mainstreaming, changing into integration and finally arriving at the current title of inclusion. While inclusion has become widespread, studies aiming to help us understand this phenomenon and variables that influence it have been limited mainly to the study of inclusion as a process and attitudes of teachers towards inclusive physical education. In order to study inclusion we also need to have questionnaires to measure the beliefs of children without disabilities.

Objective: The purpose of this study was to translate and modify the CAIPE-R instrument, to describe the structure of its components and to compare the structure of CAIPE's Czech version (CAIPE-CZ) to the original instrument.

Methods: The original questionnaire, CAIPE-R (Block, 1995), was modified and translated using a standard back translation procedure. Data were collected from 140 girls (mean age 13.12 years, SD = 1.61) and 146 boys (mean age 13.26 years, SD = 1.48) and analyzed using SPSS-PC 19.0 software.

Results: The results of principal component factor analysis with Varimax rotation have proven the two component structure of the CAIPE-CZ questionnaire. The first four items are loaded in one factor which was titled as "General beliefs about inclusion in physical education". In contrast with the original CAIPE-R questionnaire, the fifth and sixth items are loaded to the second component together with 4 other items. This component was titled "Beliefs about actual behavior".

Conclusion: CAIPE-CZ was translated using a standardized procedure and shows a high internal consistency and is also sensitive to detecting differences between groups of children with personal experiences with students with disabilities and those without such experiences. Thus CAIPE-CZ is ready to use for future studies about the attitudes of children towards inclusive physical education.

Keywords: adapted physical activity, adapted physical education, disability, special education

Prepublished online: February 22, 2012; Published: September 1, 2011

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